Hoping to grow wise.

Rob Maupin


Walls Fall Down: A Book Review

Apologies for the lapse in posting. Transitions demand a lot of attention. Getting into a rhythm little by little.

Caveat: This is not like any other post I’ve done up to this point. I was asked to do a book review of Dudley Rutherford’s new book, “Walls Fall Down.” I am not being rewarded or paid in any way for this post. To be honest, due to my schedule, I only said “yes” as a favor to one of my best friends. Read on for my response.

In my work as a professor/pastor, I have done several scholarly reviews of books before. This is a review of “Walls Fall Down” by Dudley Rutherford. The process for a book review is usually one of dissection, explanation, opposing views and highlights. I was ready to do the usual book review this time as well. The book arrived in the mail and I put it on my desk to read. A week or so passed by while I traveled and after getting home and getting my things back in order I sat down to read and evaluate. I was really delighted by the experience of reading this book—I really liked it.

I don’t have a great deal of time to go into a lot of detail but here is why liked the book so much.

  1. This is based on the Bible. That could sound cliché but I mean it’s the actual story of how Israel defeated Jericho, and how that story teaches us about walking with God today. We live in an era where many, many people don’t actually know much about God (cf I Cor 15:34) and others work hard to discredit the integrity or historicity of the text. This book starts with the idea that this event happened and that God’s approach has a great deal to teach us today. I love that. Don’t know the story at all? It’s there too.
  2. You can see Dudley’s pastoral heart. You can tell that the writing is for people to hear the Word, learn something from it and then live differently because of what it says. There is a prayer at the end of each chapter and, here’s what’s cool, its about real life. It doesn’t have that super-spiritual-but-not-like-real-people feel to it. This means more to me the longer I work with churches.
  3. It’s encouraging. For those of us who are trained to see the gaps, the mistakes, the logical fallacies etc. things can sometimes get pretty grim. Dudley’s book is full of hope and shows a good reason for that hope. There is a story about a guy named Raúl that is particularly impressive.
  4. I actually want my students and my own kids to read it. That’s a good endorsement.
  5. It’s practical and real. He addresses the 10,000 hour issue from Gladwell. He talks about visualizing and knowledge and how those exercises affect us. He teaches us why to choose courage over fear. It addressed some of the ways people experience God as well as how we have to obey God. Awesome.

So. I write with a sense of thankfulness to Dudley for this excellent book and a good reminder that if you preach to people’s brokenness, you’ll always have an audience[1]. I hope this book will be a blessing if you choose to make the purchase.


[1] This is from a conversation with Jud Wilhite… I didn’t make it up even though I wish I had…


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