Hoping to grow wise.

Rob Maupin


Posts Categorized as: disciplines




Walls Fall Down: A Book Review

Apologies for the lapse in posting. Transitions demand a lot of attention. Getting into a rhythm little by little.

Caveat: This is not like any other post I’ve done up to this point. I was asked to do a book review of Dudley Rutherford’s new book, “Walls Fall Down.” I am not being rewarded or paid in any way for this post. To be honest, due to my schedule, I only said “yes” as a favor to one of my best friends. Read on for my response.

In my work as a professor/pastor, I have done several scholarly reviews of books before. This is a review of “Walls Fall Down” by Dudley Rutherford. The process for a book review is usually one of dissection, explanation, opposing views and highlights. I was ready to do the usual book review this time as well. The book arrived in the mail and I put it on my desk to read. A week or so passed by while I traveled and after getting home and getting my things back in order I sat down to read and evaluate. I was really delighted by the experience of reading this book—I really liked it.

I don’t have a great deal of time to go into a lot of detail but here is why liked the book so much.

  1. This is based on the Bible. That could sound cliché but I mean it’s the actual story of how Israel defeated Jericho, and how that story teaches us about walking with God today. We live in an era where many, many people don’t actually know much about God (cf I Cor 15:34) and others work hard to discredit the integrity or historicity of the text. This book starts with the idea that this event happened and that God’s approach has a great deal to teach us today. I love that. Don’t know the story at all? It’s there too.
  2. You can see Dudley’s pastoral heart. You can tell that the writing is for people to hear the Word, learn something from it and then live differently because of what it says. There is a prayer at the end of each chapter and, here’s what’s cool, its about real life. It doesn’t have that super-spiritual-but-not-like-real-people feel to it. This means more to me the longer I work with churches.
  3. It’s encouraging. For those of us who are trained to see the gaps, the mistakes, the logical fallacies etc. things can sometimes get pretty grim. Dudley’s book is full of hope and shows a good reason for that hope. There is a story about a guy named Raúl that is particularly impressive.
  4. I actually want my students and my own kids to read it. That’s a good endorsement.
  5. It’s practical and real. He addresses the 10,000 hour issue from Gladwell. He talks about visualizing and knowledge and how those exercises affect us. He teaches us why to choose courage over fear. It addressed some of the ways people experience God as well as how we have to obey God. Awesome.

So. I write with a sense of thankfulness to Dudley for this excellent book and a good reminder that if you preach to people’s brokenness, you’ll always have an audience[1]. I hope this book will be a blessing if you choose to make the purchase.


[1] This is from a conversation with Jud Wilhite… I didn’t make it up even though I wish I had…


Trimmed and Burnin'

Early in my education for Christian leadership I heard and felt the tension about reading your Bible every day. There were some voices who had nearly angelic visions of word studies and parsing Greek verbs and there were others who wondered (usually aloud) about ineffectiveness, Pharisaism and a loss of love for the lost. That tension has followed me my entire ministry career. In this post, what I want to do is share why I try to read the Bible every day. I am aware of the nature of illiteracy, dyslexia, orality and individual personality, and the roles they play in this process. I believe that the fundamental issue is placing our confidence in Jesus to be our teacher and King for salvation—His love is the basis for life. A new legalism is not my goal and spiritual smugness is not in my heart as I write. Rather, this is a short explanation of why this is my practice as a leader. At its root, my issue is practical.

The godly leaders I most admire all used this practice

Joshua chapter one is the starting point for me in this regard. God tells Joshua that he is supposed to “growl” over the Word of God (usually translated “meditate”) in order to obey God fully and to lead Israel in their battles.[1] I would like to be more like Joshua as a leader. That same idea is also found in Psalm 1 where the one who focuses with God’s word day and night will flourish (like David). Peter, Paul and Jesus all mirror this idea as well.
Beyond my Biblical heroes, my missionary heroes also were deeply focused in the Word of God! Patrick’s mind was so saturated by the Bible that even as he was writing, his own syntax would slip into quoting long sections of the Bible. He uses over 200 scripture quotations in his Confessions alone. But Patrick was far more than just an introvert writing in a scriptorium somewhere lost in Ireland. Celtic Christianity became the dominant missionary force in Northern Europe for hundreds of years because of him. J. Hudson Taylor and Andrew Murray are two more missionary heroes who loved the Bible. John Sung and Watchman Nee along with the Bible women of the Chinese house church movement have been people of “one book.” Even today, effective, godly leaders of the church (and academy) that I admire have this in common.[2]

The nature of life

Here I am thinking of what Dallas Willard refers to in his book, The Spirit of the Disciplines. He says that you define “life—whatever its ultimate metaphysical nature and explanation—to be the ability to contact and selectively take in from the surroundings whatever supports its own survival, extension and enhancement.” [3] Later he talks about part of life being our ability to interact with God as part of that contacting and taking in life. If you compare this with some of Jesus’ teachings in John 5 and 6, I think the picture of the Word of God being part of what brings us life seems obvious. Athletes use nutrition as part of their main strategy for performance. As a leader, I want a wise and steady intake of the Living Word that brings life. For me this is a significant part of renewing my mind (Rom 12:2, Eph 4:23).

Societal productivity

Whether you call it the Protestant work ethic or Western Cultural improvements, Bible readers have had enormous influence on the betterment of society. Hospitals, education, child labor laws, the ending of the slave trade, anti-corruption laws, fair trial systems, etc. are all results from people who were influenced by what they read in the Bible. Literacy movements, human-trafficking opponents and people involved in the war on poverty have all been influenced by the Bible. Bob Woodberry’s [3] amazing research shows the power of what happens when Protestant missionaries are part of a culture’s development! In the end, God’s ways are good here and a guide to what is to come. I want to know more about that kind of wisdom because I want to be productive in my work for the Lord here.

Grounding in Wisdom

In the trends of culture, I am interested in what is supra-cultural—what transcends cultural boundaries and is common for all people, everywhere, for all time. In church life this is particularly important as blogs (yes, I see the humor here) books, and church events constantly expand. I have read statements that suggest that Christians read the Bible far too much. I’ve also heard statements about how it does not matter how much Bible you know, it matters how much you love people. One recent Christian leader said that they don’t care as much about what the Bible says is “wrong” but how we are supposed to treat others. Daily exposure to God’s Word gives me a starting point to evaluate the many voices I hear. What I seem to find is that “love” is usually culturally understood, but the source of love is scripturally defined. The Wisdom literature of the Bible gives us insight into how the universe functions. I remember reading Covey’s concept of the P/PC balance for effectiveness[4] and thinking that a lot of what Proverbs has to say correlates with that idea. Regular Bible reading keeps us from being carried away by any kind of trend by passionate folks who can get out of balance.

Knowing/Loving God

The most important command is to love God with all your heart, mind, soul and strength (Mt 22). In my opinion it is nearly impossible to love someone without knowing a lot about them. Two of my favorite books coincide here: The Knowledge of the Holy by A.W. Tozer and Knowing Christ Today by Dallas Willard. Both books say that knowledge is a pre-requisite to loving God. Now, let’s be clear. I’m not saying that you need to know the order of the books of the Bible to become a believer. I AM saying that the longer we are disciples, the more critical it becomes to know about the One we claim to love and serve. Knowledge is not the enemy of action or evangelism—it is the best foundation for them. The more we know about the nature, history and power of God, the more awe and reverence we receive. It is a gift. At that point, our response is the issue. But replacing poor responses with intentional ignorance is a foolish choice. Beyond the information required, as I know more about God, the more immediacy I have in my experience with Him. He gives me help, guidance and reminds me of his presence and love. He reminds me to trust him for the day and to submit to Him. I never weary of hearing Him say, “I love you.”

So. For these five reasons, I try to read the Bible every day. I don’t mean to be legalistic (I hope it’s obvious). I am not slavishly bound to this practice. If I miss a few days, I have freedom. I want to avoid Pharisaism or doctrinal arrogance. I am also aware that some people just hate the process of reading in general and some are simply unable. I don’t mean to suggest that this is something that is required for being loved by God.

Yet I will continue to invest my time, money and effort into reading God’s Word. The Word of God helps me be more productive, wiser, braver, and kinder. It sharpens my mind about human behavior (including my own). It keeps me focused on the eternal and quickly checks my bad attitudes. It is a singular blessing in my life. Final Issue: I am a better leader when I am established on the Word. This is my attempt to keep my lamp “trimmed and burning” (Matt 25) and be ready when Jesus is calling on me. Matt Perman says that “the Scriptures are at the foundations of our productivity because the Scriptures are one of the chief ways God…builds our character.”[5] O Lord, grant me more character that will be productive.

Sometime soon, I’ll write about HOW I read the Bible, but this is the foundation of WHY I do. May God bless you as you learn more about his Word in whatever way you can…


[1] From Eugene Peterson, Eat This Book, Eerdmans, 2006, pg 2. The word is “Hagah” in Hebrew

[2] An excellent example of this is Bryant Myers’ amazing book Walking With The Poor, Orbis, 1999

[3] An easy intro to his research can be found here

[4] The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People 2004, Free Press, pg 54

[5] From What’s Best Next by Matt Perman, Zondervan, 2014